GUATEMALA HUEHUETENANGO IXLAMA
GUATEMALA HUEHUETENANGO IXLAMA
GUATEMALA HUEHUETENANGO IXLAMA
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GUATEMALA HUEHUETENANGO IXLAMA

Regular price
$16.50
Sale price
$16.50
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rich and earthy with flavors of stroopwafel, concord grape, and orange blossom honey

region: huehuetenango

farm: ixlama

varietals: bourbon, caturra

grade: strictly hard bean

process: fully washed

elevation: 1524-1830 masl

importer: balzac brothers

from balzac brothers:

For over 50 years, Balzac Brothers has worked with Transcafe not only to strengthen our Guatemalan specialty offerings, but also to bolster the relationships Transcafe maintains with smallholder farmers all across Guatemala. We’re proud to present Ixlama as an offering again this year, bearing in mind the meticulous processing that Transcafe implements at their mills to ensure that the cup quality and profile stay clean and consistent from year to year. Ixlama comes from the department of Huehuetenango near the Guatemala-Mexico border, a region known for its rugged landscapes, high elevation, and for the 22 ethnic groups of Mayan descent who call this community home. This coffee is the culmination of work by approximately 120 family producers in the municipalities of San Pedro Necta and La Libertad. Many producers here identify as Maya, speak one of the seven local dialects, and work on their farms dressed in the colorful, hand-loomed textiles associated with their individual communities — a tradition that contributes to Guatemala's rich culture and to the unique identity of this coffee-growing country. Consisting of 50 percent Bourbon and 50 percent Caturra varietals, this coffee was grown at an
elevation of 1,524 to 1,830 meters above sea level. Ixlama, a shade-grown coffee, is harvested and brought to Transcafe’s mill at Caserio Teogal Aldea San Martin. At the mill, located near the town of Todos Santos, coffees are sun-dried on cement patios for four days before being placed in “guardiolas,” a type of coffee dryer patented by a Guatemalan resident in 1872. The coffees are then computer-sorted by color and separated by density mechanically, resulting in a superior, clean, and bright cup.